Ways to Win Against Allergy Season

Ways to Win Against Allergy Season

This harsh, cold winter has the weather bureau telling news viewers that this allergy season is going to be the worst. Their info comes from the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, who says that even before winter finally broke people were already suffering from symptoms of allergy season.

Allergy suffers are still going to be looking for ways to alleviate their symptoms—from itchy eyes and stuffy noses, to sneezing.

There is more than one type of allergy, which means there are different ways to prevent or alleviate symptoms for each type:

Pollen Allergy

  • The best fight against pollen allergies is a daily dose of antihistamines and decongestants. Prescription medications and over-the-counter supplements are the same in most respects. For those that have severe pollen allergies if might be helpful to get immunotherapy, aka allergy shots.
  • Unfortunately for pollen allergy sufferers, high pollen days mean it’s best to stay indoors. Windy days are also difficult days for allergies. On these days it’s not only beneficial to stay indoors, but it also helps to keep the windows closed.

Dust Mite Allergy

  • As if outdoor allergies aren’t bad enough, those that suffer from dust might allergies will be fighting sneezing indoors too. Dust mite covers can be used over mattresses and pillows. It also helps to keep the house clean, and free of dust.

Mold Allergy

  • Mold is one of the biggest issues after winter. The accumulation of Autumn’s leaves left a great place for mold to grow. If the leaves need to be cleared by someone that suffers from a mold allergy, it is important to wear a disposable mask to keep the mold spores out of the sinuses.
  • Avoid owning indoor plants, since the soil is a great place for mold to grow.

General seasonal allergy relief can come from many different places, from over-the-counter supplements to natural remedies.

  • Antihistamines

Over-the-counter antihistamines are great for people that suffer from mild allergies. Most of them work best when taken daily during allergy season, but some people can get away with just taking them when allergy symptoms arise. Again, if someone suffers from severe allergies their best bet is to get allergy shots from their doctor.

  • Nasal sprays

Nasal sprays are becoming popular, especially now that they are available over-the-counter. Nasal irrigation works well too, which is a drug free way to clear out the sinuses from toxins and histamines.

  • Probiotics

A new study done by the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that a daily dose of probiotics in combination with an antihistamine reduced itching and watering eyes in allergy sufferers.

  • Natural remedies

There are numerous natural remedies that can help with allergies. Acupuncture is thought to help with a wide array of health issues. Herbal remedies that help allergy symptoms include butterbur and stinging nettle (which can be found in tea form).

  • Healthy diet

It’s truly amazing what eating the right foods can do for the human body. A recent article in Shape magazine suggests that a diet change can make a huge difference, and it isn’t just about eating healthier foods. Clifford Bassett, MD, medical director at Allergy and Asthma Care of NY, points out that some foods can actually trigger allergies. For someone that suffers from seasonal allergies it’s best to avoid things like stone fruits. These fruits, which include peaches, can instigate a reaction in people allergic to tree pollen.

Good food choices for allergy sufferers include:

o   Tuna- Rich in Omega 3 fatty acids, it helps reduce inflammation in the sinuses. This could mean less congestion and less sneezing.

o   Green Tea- Some antioxidants are believed to help stop the production of histamine. This could be why some people suggest upping vitamin C intake during allergy season too.

o   Any other antioxidant rich foods- There are many different types of antioxidants, the most common being vitamins A, C, and E, as well as folic acid and Beta-carotene.

Seasonal allergies can be a pain, but they don’t have to ruin the entire spring or summer. Just be aware of the things that trigger them, and be prepared with the right things to fight them.

 

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

 

 



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